Discussion:
Disable message "A start job is running for myservice"
(too old to reply)
Michael Biebl
2018-12-10 13:29:51 UTC
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Am Mo., 10. Dez. 2018 um 14:26 Uhr schrieb Lennart Poettering
but these parameter cannot modify the behaviour.
Is there some way to do it ?
No there is not. This is compiled in and global. You can turn off all
status output though…
It's hard-coded in
https://github.com/systemd/systemd/blob/master/src/core/manager.c#L87

I thought the eye-of-cylon message kicked in automatically, even if
status messages were turned off (say via quiet)?
--
Why is it that all of the instruments seeking intelligent life in the
universe are pointed away from Earth?
Reindl Harald
2018-12-10 13:00:56 UTC
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Dear all,
I'm studying systemd to write a service that start and is executed
before a local-fs.target.
To do my test, I have written a simple service.
========================================
[Unit]
Description=myservice
DefaultDependencies=no
[Service]
Type=oneshot
ExecStart=/bin/bash -c "echo begin; sleep 20; echo end"
RemainAfterExit=true
========================================
[ ***          ] A start job is running for myservice ( X sec / Y )
with the counter X that grow up.
I have not found a way to modify the elapsed time after systemd begin to
show this message.
I could have a service that require more that 10 seconds to start (for
example a mount of a UBI volume) and I would like to not have this message.
I read about
TimeoutSec=
TimeoutStartSec=
TimeoutStopSec=
RuntimeMaxSec=
but these parameter cannot modify the behaviour.
Is there some way to do it?
no and this all sounds like seeking a solution for a non existing
problem! what in the world do you achieve whne your system hangs around
at boot and don't tell you any reason?

"TimeoutStartSec=" controls the limit so that it won't get killed
prematurely and having a system talking to you telling it's not dead is
a good thing, always
Paolo Minazzi
2018-12-10 13:09:32 UTC
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Post by Reindl Harald
no and this all sounds like seeking a solution for a non existing
problem! what in the world do you achieve whne your system hangs around
at boot and don't tell you any reason?
"TimeoutStartSec=" controls the limit so that it won't get killed
prematurely and having a system talking to you telling it's not dead is
a good thing, always
Hi Reindl,
thanks for your fast replay.
I understand your suggestion.
But there are cases , for example the attaching and mount of an UBI
volume, that can require more than 8 seconds. I would prefer a message
that the mounting process in running, and not a generic systemd message
with the counter. The systemd message seems an error, this is my idea.
Thanks again,
Paolo
Reindl Harald
2018-12-10 13:12:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paolo Minazzi
Post by Reindl Harald
no and this all sounds like seeking a solution for a non existing
problem! what in the world do you achieve whne your system hangs around
at boot and don't tell you any reason?
"TimeoutStartSec=" controls the limit so that it won't get killed
prematurely and having a system talking to you telling it's not dead is
a good thing, always
Hi Reindl,
thanks for your fast replay.
I understand your suggestion.
But there are cases , for example the attaching and mount of an UBI
volume, that can require more than 8 seconds. I would prefer a message
that the mounting process in running, and not a generic systemd message
with the counter. The systemd message seems an error, this is my idea.
no, the message is pretty fine, it tells which service is about to be
started and so just make your "Description=" clear which is displayed in
context and when it "seems an error" the error is the uneducated user in
front of the screen and not systemd

Lennart Poettering
2018-12-10 14:32:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Biebl
but these parameter cannot modify the behaviour.
Is there some way to do it ?
No there is not. This is compiled in and global. You can turn off all
status output though…
It's hard-coded in
https://github.com/systemd/systemd/blob/master/src/core/manager.c#L87
I thought the eye-of-cylon message kicked in automatically, even if
status messages were turned off (say via quiet)?
No, when status messages are turned off entirely, then this is
suppressed, see manager_status_printf(), which is called from
manager_print_jobs_in_progress()...

Lennart

--
Lennart Poettering, Red Hat
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