Discussion:
Failed to mount early API filesystems, freezing execution
(too old to reply)
Esben Stien
2018-10-30 13:58:37 UTC
Permalink
I have an old Ubuntu 16.04 that I upgraded and during the upgrade, it
had a power failure.

Now I only see this when I boot:

failed to determine whether /sys is mount point
failed to mount early api filesystems, freezing execution

Here's a photo of the screen:

https://imgur.com/a/uPH7HTd

I've tried both targets:

systemd.unit=emergency.target
systemd.unit=rescue.target

, but I'm ending up the same place.

Is there any way to atleast get a shell?

I'm not sure what systemd service it's complaining about?

Any pointers as to what I can try?

Thanks;)
Lennart Poettering
2018-10-30 14:17:45 UTC
Permalink
I have an old Ubuntu 16.04 that I upgraded and during the upgrade, it had a
power failure.
failed to determine whether /sys is mount point
failed to mount early api filesystems, freezing execution
https://imgur.com/a/uPH7HTd
systemd.unit=emergency.target
systemd.unit=rescue.target
, but I'm ending up the same place.
Is there any way to atleast get a shell?
I'm not sure what systemd service it's complaining about?
Any pointers as to what I can try?
This suggests that the root partition you are trying to boot doesn't
have properly set up /sys, /proc or /dev directories that we could
mount stuff too, or your intird set things up weirdly.

Either way I think it would be best to ping your downstream distro
about this.

Lennart
--
Lennart Poettering, Red Hat
Esben Stien
2018-10-30 15:14:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lennart Poettering
This suggests that the root partition you are trying to boot doesn't
have properly set up /sys, /proc or /dev directories that we could
mount stuff too, or your intird set things up weirdly.
Right, but why is it freezing, as opposed to giving me some kind of
shell where I can
verify what's going on and fix it? Also, there is no way to boot into a
shell that can
have its own /sys, /proc and /dev, allowing me to inspect the filesystem
and chroot
and such?

I have no options but to create a bootable USB and inspect? This just
seems terribly
inflexible;)
Post by Lennart Poettering
Either way I think it would be best to ping your downstream distro
about this.
They don't have proper channels. I've written to the web forum, but
there's no reply.
Lennart Poettering
2018-10-30 15:30:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lennart Poettering
This suggests that the root partition you are trying to boot doesn't
have properly set up /sys, /proc or /dev directories that we could
mount stuff too, or your intird set things up weirdly.
Right, but why is it freezing, as opposed to giving me some kind of shell
where I can
verify what's going on and fix it? Also, there is no way to boot into a
shell that can
have its own /sys, /proc and /dev, allowing me to inspect the filesystem and
chroot
and such?
You can request a shell, use init=/bin/sh on the kernel cmdline.

We generally don't hand out unrestricted shells just like that, for
security reasons. By expecting you to add init=/bin/sh to the cmdline
there's an extra level of protection as boot loaders which care about
security usually restrict the ability to manipulate the kernel
cmdline, and thus not anyone who wants gets a free shell.
They don't have proper channels. I've written to the web forum, but there's
no reply.
Well, pick a different distro, then?

Lennart
--
Lennart Poettering, Red Hat
Jan Claeys
2018-10-31 01:57:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Esben Stien
Post by Lennart Poettering
Either way I think it would be best to ping your downstream distro
about this.
They don't have proper channels. I've written to the web forum, but
there's no reply.
You got a reply there, although not the one you wanted.

You could also ask on https://askubuntu.com/
--
Jan Claeys
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